Friction Welding Dissimilar Metals

One of the most significant benefits of friction welding is the ability to weld dissimilar metals, many combinations of which are not possible with conventional welding. Each metal type has its mechanical properties, carbon equivalent, thermal expansion rates, melting points, and post-weld residual stresses. Friction welding does not use filler metals, allowing for the focus to be on the characteristics of the two joining metals.

The solid-state welding process heats materials to a plasticized state without melting. This point is essential because liquifying metals produce intermetallic compounds in the weld joint when they solidify, causing brittleness. Air is also void during the welding process eliminating porosity or air pockets in the weld. Friction welding also has a very narrow heat-affected zone protecting the molecular structure and grain of the base materials around the weld. Another huge advantage is a complete weld across the entire weld interface, where the two parts meet, not just the outer perimeter. All these factors contribute to successfully welding dissimilar and similar metals with a high strength weld as strong as the parent materials.

Watch a compilation of dissimilar metal welding on various size computer-controlled friction welding centers.

Friction welding is a self-cleaning process removing impurities on the weld surfaces and interface. Oil and dirt burn off during the friction phase or are forced out with the extra material, called upset, displaced during forging. Upset or part shortening is accounted for to achieve the desired part length. The waste forced outside the weld zone is called flash, which may remain or be removed post-weld depending on the application. Heat-treating or a chilling process of the welded metals may also be required to ensure a strong bond.

AFW is North America’s largest friction welder and are experts at dissimilar metal welding!

Welding Dissimilar Metals Chart

Alloy Steel Welding

3140 to 2112
4032
4115
4130 to 1034, 4130, 4140, 4142
4140 to 1020, 1035, 1045, 4142
4340
5120L to 1026
51200 to 1040, 8620
5130 to 1018
8620 to 1018
9310
9650 to 6150
98BV40

High-Speed Steel Welding

H-13 to 1018
M-1 to 1040, 1045, 1050, 1070, 8650
M-2 to 1045
M-4 to Matrix Alloy
M-7 to 1045
M-10 to 1045
M-50
S-1 to 1080

Aluminum Welding

Aluminum to Carbon Steel
1100
2024
6061 to 356 Cast
6061 T-4 to 1100, 6063 T-4
6063 356 Cast
M-821 to 8740

Carbon Steel Welding

1008 to 1037, 1052
1010 to 8620
1013 to 1018, 1117
1018 to 1052, 1141, 5130, EX-TEN50
1020 to 1037, 1095, 1140
1040 to 1045
1041
1045 to 1141, 4150, 8620, EX-TEN50
1049
1085 to 1017
1095 to 1020
1117
1141
T-11
T-22

Stainless Steel and Austenitic Stainless Steel Welding

302 SS to 1020, 1045, 410 SS, 440 SS, 17-4 PH
303 SS to 1018, 1045, 1117
304 SS to 1020, 1045, Hastelloy B and C, Copper
309 SS to 1010
316 SS to 1018, 1020, 1045, 1117
321 SS to 8630
347 SS to 17-4 PH
410 SS to 1045
416 SS to 1018, 1045, 440 SS
17-4 PH to 1117, 310 SS, 302 SS
CARP 20 to 1018, 1020, 1045
2205 Duplex to 1018

Other Welding Materials

Carbide 3411 to 1020
Sintered Carbide to 1018
INCO 600 to INCO 600
INCO 713C to 1036, 1040, 4140, 5140, 8630
INCO 713LC to 5140, d979
INCO 718 to AMS6304, INCOLOY 901, WASPALOY
INCO 751 to 1045, 4140
Inconel X to 8645
Molybdenum
Monel 400 to 1020, 1026
Nickel 200
T-1 to 4140
Tantalum to 1018, 302 SS
Titanium to 1018, 1100 Aluminum
Tungsten
Tungsten Carbide to 1020

Other Non-Ferrous Welding

Aluminum to1045, Bronze
Brass
Bronze to Steel
Copper (Cu) to Copper, Silver, 1020 steel
Copper to Stainless Steel

Contact American Friction Welding today for more information or to request a quote!